Habemus Altare

Mar 25

http://affcath.tumblr.com/post/80690432655/annuenobisdomine-affcath-the-new-acna -

chrishardingsblog:

affcath:

chrishardingsblog:

affcath:

annuenobisdomine:

affcath:

The new ACNA Catechism has a form for the Sinner’s Prayer and references it in the Catechism itself as the first step someone coming to Christianity should take

Well that’s…sad.

How many times can you say “Lord Jesus” in a single paragraph?

Prayer of…

Ugh, boo on all of you. “God I thank you that I am not like these silly ACNA Christians.” Get over yourselves. This is not a standard evangelical ‘sinner’s prayer.’ There is no hint in the Catechism that they teach ‘just pray this and and you’re good.’ In fact, the prayer is introduced this way:

"God calls us to repentance and faith in Christ, and a way to enter into life in Christ is to say a prayer like this – preferably in the presence of a mature Christian… "

I don’t think any of can honestly deny that prayers like their form HAVE been ‘a way to enter into life in Christ’ for very many people, both inside and outside the Episcopal Church. There’s even an alternative prayer for those who can’t pray the first one sincerely. When was the last time you heard that from a standard ‘sinner’s prayer’ presentation?

Grow up. Stop being ecclesial Mean Girls.

I don’t think dealing with mainline Christian problems instead of evangelical Christian problems is going to save me, I trust in Jesus. So that first bit was pretty unnecessary.

It is most definitely a standard evangelical sinner’s prayer. It follows the format (1) confessing sins; (2) asking Jesus to cover them; (3) accepting him as Lord of your life. It’s the same format as Billy Graham’s, Campus Crusade, and any other parachurch evangelical group. It’s even written in evangelical-ese, which is what I was pointing out with the “Lord Jesus” comment. 

The inquirer’s prayer is basically saying “God help me to believe this shit” and I’m pretty sure it’s designed to lead people to saying the Sinner’s Prayer so I’m not sure why you’re bringing that up. I’m pretty sure the Alpha course has something similar.

Scripture, the ancient church, and Anglican tradition don’t know anything about some kind of special three-part prayer you say in front of people as “a way to enter into life in Christ”. We have this thing called baptism that inevitably winds up getting knocked down a notch or two in importance when you bring the Sinner’s Prayer into the mix. You can already see that at work in the ACNA Catechism, which seems like it wants to make baptism a public recognition ceremony of what happened in the Sinner’s Prayer but also throws in more traditional Anglican stuff in an attempt to appease everybody. 

The sinner’s prayer is a product of American revivalism and doesn’t really have much of anything to do with historic Christianity and doesn’t really have anything to do with Anglicanism. It doesn’t have a place in an Anglican catechism.

I bring up that ACNA included it in their catechism to show that instead of trying to preserve the reformed catholicism that they claim we left behind, they’re instead making up this charismatic-evangelical-in-Catholic-clothing mishmash Christianity (“Three Streams”, “Convergence,” etc.) 

Hmm, I’m not buying it.

My point is that, as I read this Catechism, the theology expressed in it is NOT that of a standard Evangelical Sinner’s Prayer.

This is why I brought up the Inquirer’s Prayer (plus, haven’t you ever needed to pray “God help me to believe this shit”? I know I have.) The theology undergirding the Sinner’s Prayer coming out of “Billy Graham’s, Campus Crusade, and any other parachurch evangelical group” doesn’t have any space for something like an ‘Inquirer’s Prayer.’

I saw the ‘Prayer of Repentance and Faith’ as expressing the same theology behind the admission to the Catechumenate in the Book of Occasional Services (Q: “What do you seek?” A: “Life in Christ.” Q: “Will you open your ears to hear the Word of God and your heart and mind to receive the Lord Jesus?” A: “I will, with God’s help.”).

Sure, it does it in a way that looks a lot more ‘Evangelical’ than our way does it. But—shock horror—there are Evangelicals in the Episcopal Church still, and “eww it’s too Evangelical” is a pretty poor way to do theology, let alone Church unity.

In this as in all things, your mileage may vary.

Thanks for the response, though (I mean it)!

The way that I read the Catechism looks something like this:

How should I respond to the Gospel?
Repent and put my faith in Jesus
What does that mean?
Repentance means ___
Faith means __
How do I do that?
You can do that whenever you want, one way is to pray the Sinner’s Prayer (no other way is mentioned)
What should I do next?
If I haven’t been baptized, I should be baptized into the death and resurrection of Jesus and, therefore, into membership in the Church

The Biblical answer is: “Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins.”

I don’t have a problem with praying a prayer like the one they published, even if its a jumble of evangelical-ese cliches that I don’t personally care for.

I have a problem with using the Sinner’s Prayer as a stand-in for baptism, and knocking baptism down a peg accordingly. I don’t think that theology of baptism has a place in a catechism labeled “Anglican”. 

http://affcath.tumblr.com/post/80690432655/annuenobisdomine-affcath-the-new-acna -

chrishardingsblog:

affcath:

annuenobisdomine:

affcath:

The new ACNA Catechism has a form for the Sinner’s Prayer and references it in the Catechism itself as the first step someone coming to Christianity should take

Well that’s…sad.

How many times can you say “Lord Jesus” in a single paragraph?

Prayer of…

Ugh, boo on all of you. “God I thank you that I am not like these silly ACNA Christians.” Get over yourselves. This is not a standard evangelical ‘sinner’s prayer.’ There is no hint in the Catechism that they teach ‘just pray this and and you’re good.’ In fact, the prayer is introduced this way:

"God calls us to repentance and faith in Christ, and a way to enter into life in Christ is to say a prayer like this – preferably in the presence of a mature Christian… "

I don’t think any of can honestly deny that prayers like their form HAVE been ‘a way to enter into life in Christ’ for very many people, both inside and outside the Episcopal Church. There’s even an alternative prayer for those who can’t pray the first one sincerely. When was the last time you heard that from a standard ‘sinner’s prayer’ presentation?

Grow up. Stop being ecclesial Mean Girls.

I don’t think dealing with mainline Christian problems instead of evangelical Christian problems is going to save me, I trust in Jesus. So that first bit was pretty unnecessary.

It is most definitely a standard evangelical sinner’s prayer. It follows the format (1) confessing sins; (2) asking Jesus to cover them; (3) accepting him as Lord of your life. It’s the same format as Billy Graham’s, Campus Crusade, and any other parachurch evangelical group. It’s even written in evangelical-ese, which is what I was pointing out with the “Lord Jesus” comment. 

The inquirer’s prayer is basically saying “God help me to believe this shit” and I’m pretty sure it’s designed to lead people to saying the Sinner’s Prayer so I’m not sure why you’re bringing that up. I’m pretty sure the Alpha course has something similar.

Scripture, the ancient church, and Anglican tradition don’t know anything about some kind of special three-part prayer you say in front of people as “a way to enter into life in Christ”. We have this thing called baptism that inevitably winds up getting knocked down a notch or two in importance when you bring the Sinner’s Prayer into the mix. You can already see that at work in the ACNA Catechism, which seems like it wants to make baptism a public recognition ceremony of what happened in the Sinner’s Prayer but also throws in more traditional Anglican stuff in an attempt to appease everybody. 

The sinner’s prayer is a product of American revivalism and doesn’t really have much of anything to do with historic Christianity and doesn’t really have anything to do with Anglicanism. It doesn’t have a place in an Anglican catechism.

I bring up that ACNA included it in their catechism to show that instead of trying to preserve the reformed catholicism that they claim we left behind, they’re instead making up this charismatic-evangelical-in-Catholic-clothing mishmash Christianity (“Three Streams”, “Convergence,” etc.) 

annuenobisdomine:

affcath:

The new ACNA Catechism has a form for the Sinner’s Prayer and references it in the Catechism itself as the first step someone coming to Christianity should take

Well that’s…sad.

How many times can you say “Lord Jesus” in a single paragraph?

Prayer of Repentance and Faith
"Lord Jesus Christ, I confess my faults, shortcomings, sins, and rebellious acts, and ask you to  forgive me. I embrace you, Lord Jesus, as my Savior and Lord. Thank you for your atoning death on the cross in obedience to your Father’s will to put away my sins. I enthrone you, Lord Jesus, to be in charge of every part of my life, and I ask you to indwell and empower me with your Holy Spirit, so that I may live as your faithful follower from now on. Amen."

The new ACNA Catechism has a form for the Sinner’s Prayer and references it in the Catechism itself as the first step someone coming to Christianity should take

Mar 24

“In the mainline we have to recover a sense of identity, what we do believe. I think we need to be theologically and doctrinally clear. I think we need to recover a sense of the possibility of the supernatural as part of truth. Basically I think a third way is a non-literalist recovery of orthodox doctrine combined with a progressive biblical social vision.” — My pastor and I have good talks (via godinthebrokenness)

(via holabrody)

“We must overturn so many idols, the idol of self first of all, so that we can be humble, and only from our humility can we learn to be redeemers, can we learn to work together in the way the world really needs. Liberation that raises a cry against others is no true liberation. Liberation that means revolutions of hate and violence and takes away the lives of others or abases the dignity of others cannot be true liberty. True liberty does violence to self and, like Christ, who disregarded that he was sovereign becomes a slave to serve others.” — Archbishop Oscar Romero (via decaforhightest)

(via ohzeitgeist)

"Israel" and the People of God: Wright & Response -

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Nedi Rivera!
Nedi Rivera (born March 24, 1946), is a suffragan bishop and Episcopal priest. She is the first Hispanic woman bishop and the 12th woman bishop in the Episcopal Church. Her father, Bishop Victor Manuel Rivera, was a prominent opponent of the ordination of women.
Rivera (birth name: Bavi Edna Rivera) is one of three daughters born to a Puerto Rican father, the late Rt. Rev. Victor Manuel Rivera, third Bishop (1968 to 1988) of San Joaquin, California and to an Anglo mother the late Barbara Ross Lamb. Rivera grew up in Visalia, California and went to an Episcopal convent boarding school in Tucson, Arizona. A nun at the convent advised her to attend Wheaton College in Massachusetts, believing that Rivera would like it there. At Wheaton she majored in Physics and also took calculus. In 1968, she earned a BA in physics and married six weeks after her graduation. Instead of perusing a career in physics, she dedicated herself to her two daughters and two sons and volunteer work that included convening a youth group for church in her home and bookkeeping.
Rivera’s father was the Rt. Rev. Victor Manuel Rivera, the third Bishop of San Joaquin, California. In 1972, she learned at a meeting, that the church was planning on ordaining women as priests someday. Being raised within the religious beliefs of the Episcopal Church, served as an influential factor when she decided that she wanted to become a priest. However, one of the obstacles that she would have to face was convincing her very own father who opposed women being ordained priests. Rivera attended the seminary and was ordained a church deacon on June 1975. In 1976, she earned her Master of Divinity degree from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific (CDSP) in Berkeley, California and on June of that same year, she was ordained to the priesthood, her father, however did not attend her ordination as a priest. Rivera served at various churches in the dioceses of California and El Camino Real.
From 1994-2004, she served as rector of St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church in San Francisco. Rivera, who earned a D.D. (Doctor of Divinity) degree from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, was elected bishop suffragan in 2004 and assigned to serve in the Diocese of Olympia. It is a custom of the church that when a new bishop is ordinated, the other bishops gather around the new bishop and each of them lays a hand on his/her head while saying a prayer. At the end of the prayer, the bishops move their hands away from the new bishop head. Her father, who had a change of heart, was among the bishops present and proudly patted her with affection rather than liturgy. Rivera, thus became the first Hispanic woman bishop and the 12th woman bishop in the Episcopal Church. She had to work hard to become conversant in Spanish (English was spoken at home) and now celebrates and preaches in Spanish.
At the Diocese of Olympia, which is located in Seattle, Washington, she oversaw particular ministries, including evangelism, faith formation and ethnic ministries. As a member of the diocesan’s “We Will Stand With You team,” she provides the leadership and support for ongoing fund-raising to rebuild St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and School in New Orleans that was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. She helped to start an initiative to get the diocese to buy 30,000 malaria nets to be distributed in African countries.
Rivera, who since June 29, 1968 had been married to the Rev. Robert (Bob) Moore, was consecrated on January 22, 2005. She was elected by unanimous vote during a special convention to “Provisional Bishop” by theDiocese of Eastern Oregon, to serve through Spring 2012. Rivera continued to serve as suffragan bishop in the Seattle-based Diocese of Olympia while working one-third of her time in Eastern Oregon, for which the diocese will reimburse the diocese in Seattle. Rivera serves on the College for Bishops Advisory Committee and Curriculum Board, Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop, and on the House of Bishops’ Planning Committee on the national church level.

[edit]

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Nedi Rivera!

Nedi Rivera (born March 24, 1946), is a suffragan bishop and Episcopal priest. She is the first Hispanic woman bishop and the 12th woman bishop in the Episcopal Church. Her father, Bishop Victor Manuel Rivera, was a prominent opponent of the ordination of women.

Rivera (birth name: Bavi Edna Rivera) is one of three daughters born to a Puerto Rican father, the late Rt. Rev. Victor Manuel Rivera, third Bishop (1968 to 1988) of San Joaquin, California and to an Anglo mother the late Barbara Ross Lamb. Rivera grew up in Visalia, California and went to an Episcopal convent boarding school in Tucson, Arizona. A nun at the convent advised her to attend Wheaton College in Massachusetts, believing that Rivera would like it there. At Wheaton she majored in Physics and also took calculus. In 1968, she earned a BA in physics and married six weeks after her graduation. Instead of perusing a career in physics, she dedicated herself to her two daughters and two sons and volunteer work that included convening a youth group for church in her home and bookkeeping.

Rivera’s father was the Rt. Rev. Victor Manuel Rivera, the third Bishop of San Joaquin, California. In 1972, she learned at a meeting, that the church was planning on ordaining women as priests someday. Being raised within the religious beliefs of the Episcopal Church, served as an influential factor when she decided that she wanted to become a priest. However, one of the obstacles that she would have to face was convincing her very own father who opposed women being ordained priests. Rivera attended the seminary and was ordained a church deacon on June 1975. In 1976, she earned her Master of Divinity degree from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific (CDSP) in Berkeley, California and on June of that same year, she was ordained to the priesthood, her father, however did not attend her ordination as a priest. Rivera served at various churches in the dioceses of California and El Camino Real.

From 1994-2004, she served as rector of St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church in San Francisco. Rivera, who earned a D.D. (Doctor of Divinity) degree from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, was elected bishop suffragan in 2004 and assigned to serve in the Diocese of Olympia. It is a custom of the church that when a new bishop is ordinated, the other bishops gather around the new bishop and each of them lays a hand on his/her head while saying a prayer. At the end of the prayer, the bishops move their hands away from the new bishop head. Her father, who had a change of heart, was among the bishops present and proudly patted her with affection rather than liturgy. Rivera, thus became the first Hispanic woman bishop and the 12th woman bishop in the Episcopal Church. She had to work hard to become conversant in Spanish (English was spoken at home) and now celebrates and preaches in Spanish.

At the Diocese of Olympia, which is located in Seattle, Washington, she oversaw particular ministries, including evangelism, faith formation and ethnic ministries. As a member of the diocesan’s “We Will Stand With You team,” she provides the leadership and support for ongoing fund-raising to rebuild St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and School in New Orleans that was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. She helped to start an initiative to get the diocese to buy 30,000 malaria nets to be distributed in African countries.

Rivera, who since June 29, 1968 had been married to the Rev. Robert (Bob) Moore, was consecrated on January 22, 2005. She was elected by unanimous vote during a special convention to “Provisional Bishop” by theDiocese of Eastern Oregon, to serve through Spring 2012. Rivera continued to serve as suffragan bishop in the Seattle-based Diocese of Olympia while working one-third of her time in Eastern Oregon, for which the diocese will reimburse the diocese in Seattle. Rivera serves on the College for Bishops Advisory Committee and Curriculum Board, Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop, and on the House of Bishops’ Planning Committee on the national church level.

[edit]

(via quisqueyameetsborinken)

Mar 22

deos-lux-mea asked: So what's the meaning behind your URL?

"Aff Cath" is an abbreviation for "Affirming Catholicism" which is a current within the Anglican Communion that supports progressive Anglo-Catholicism and the inclusion of women and LGBT people in the threefold ministry of the church.

Mar 21

“It’s important to remember that the word ‘Lent’ itself comes from the old English word for ‘spring’. It’s not about feeling gloomy for forty days; it’s not about making yourself miserable for forty days; it’s not even about giving things up for forty days. Lent is springtime. It’s preparing for that great climax of springtime which is Easter—new life bursting through death. And as we prepare ourselves for Easter during these days, by prayer and by self-denial, what motivates us and what fills the horizon is not self-denial as an end in itself but trying to sweep and clean the room of our own minds and hearts so that the new life really may have room to come in and take over and transform us at Easter.” — Rowan Williams (via mackjao)

(via my-ear-trumpet)